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Food Science Projects

Do you play with your food? Maybe you should. There is a lot of fun and educational science to be found in the kitchen. These projects will help you explore cooking chemistry and the science of foods.
  1. Ice Cream Projects (9)

Rock Candy Video Tutorial
You don't have to visit a candy store to get colorful rock candy. See how easy it is to grow your own sparkling (and tasty) rock candy crystals at home.

Edible Slime Recipes
Nearly all of the slime recipes are non-toxic, but that doesn't mean the ingredients or slime are good enough to eat. This is a collection of edible slime recipes. Some edible slime tastes good; some edible slime tastes terrible. All of these recipes are safe to eat as food.

Baking Soda Volcano
Okay, it's the kitchen equivalent of a volcano, not a real one. The 'eruption' is cool all the same! It's also more or less non-toxic, which adds to its appeal.

Mentos & Diet Soda Fountain
Candies and diet soda together can make a chemical 'volcano' with an eruption several feet high. If the normal baking soda volcano is too tame for you, give this project a try.

Yogurt Chemistry
Yogurt is made by fermenting milk. Here's how to make yogurt and a look at the chemistry of yogurt.

How To Make Buttermilk
If you don't have buttermilk on hand, it's easy to apply a little kitchen chemistry to make buttermilk from regular milk.

Rock Candy Instructions
Rock candy is candy made by crystallizing sugar. You can grow sugar crystals yourself, plus add color and flavor to make rock candy that you can eat.

Instant Sorbet in a Baggie
Make sorbet in a baggie, instantly! Use freezing point depression to lower the temperature of sorbet to freeze it, without a freezer.

Stove Top Frozen Pizza Science Experiment
Try an experiment to see whether or not you can successfully cook a frozen pizza on a stove top.

Absinthe Recipe
Absinthe has been enjoying a resurgence in popularity, as countries lift the ban on making the green wormwood and anise-flavored spirit. Learn about the history of the liqueur, why it was banned, a bit about its chemistry, how to make absinthe, and how to drink it.

Baking Powder and Baking Soda Substitution
Baking powder and baking soda both are leavening agents, which means they help baked goods to rise. They are not the same chemical, but you can substitute one for another in recipes. Here's how.

Baking Soda & Vinegar Foam Fight
This is a twist on the classic baking soda volcano, where you use the ingredients to make squirt-able fountains of foam.

Browning of Apples
Perform an experiment to observe the effects of acids, bases, and water on the rate of browning of cut apples or other produce.

Cabbage pH Indicator
Make your own pH indicator solution! Red cabbage juice indicator is easy to make, exhibits a wide range of colors, and can be used to make your own pH paper strips.

Candy Chromatography
Analyze the dyes used in your favorite candies with paper chromatography using a coffee filter, colored candies, and a salt solution.

Candy Spark in the Dark
Wintergreen Lifesavers aren't the only candies that can make a spark in the dark. Take an in-depth look at the mechanism behind this special chemiluminescence caused by friction.

Carbonated Fizzy Fruit
Use dry ice to carbonate fruit. The fruit will be filled with tingly carbon dioxide bubbles, like a soda. The fizzy fruit is great to eat on its own or it can be used in recipes.

Dry Ice Ice Cream Recipe
Are you in a hurry for your ice cream? Try this quick and easy dry ice ice cream recipe. The ice cream comes out carbonated, so it's very interesting.

Easter Egg Dyes from the Kitchen
These are easy instructions for making your own natural Easter egg dyes, using fruits, vegetables, and spices.

Edible Glitter
Make your own edible glitter. It's easy and inexpensive and safe.

Edible Slime
Most slime recipes are non-toxic, but there are only a few you can actually eat and none that taste as good as this one! Here's how to make edible slime.

Egg in a Bottle Demonstration
You don't see air and might not think much of it is contained in a bottle, but air and the pressure it exerts can be very powerful. The egg in a bottle demonstration illustrates the concept of air pressure.

Ethanol Distillation
Moonshine is a liquor made from fermented corn. Learn about distillation, condensation, and how this alcoholic beverage is made.

Fireworks in a Glass
Fireworks are a beautiful and fun part of many celebrations, but not something you want kids to make themselves. However, even very young explorers can experiment with these safe underwater fireworks.

Fizzy Potion Recipe
Make a non-toxic fizzy Mad Scientist potion using ingredients from your kitchen. The potion looks evil, but it is safe enough to drink.

Fried Green Egg
Red cabbage juice contains a natural pH indicator that changes color from purple to green under basic (alkaline) conditions. You can use this reaction to make a fried green egg.

Fruit Battery
If you have fruit, a couple of nails, and wire then you can generate electricity to turn on a light bulb. Learn how to make a fruit battery. It's fun, safe, and easy.

Fruit Ripening and Ethylene Experiment
Measure the ripening of fruit from exposure to the plant hormone ethylene by testing starch levels with an iodine solution. This easy experiment can be performed on several types of fruit, such as apples, pears, and bananas.

Fruity Putty
These are step-by-step instructions on how to make fruity putty.

Gelatin Plastic
Colorful gelatin shapes can be used to make jewelry, mobiles, decorations, and more!

Glowing Hand of Doom Punch
Glowing Hand of Doom punch is a great punch for Halloween parties or mad scientist parties. Here's how to make a glowing hand rise from the punch, which is bubbling and producing fog.

Glowing Jell-O Recipe
It's incredibly easy to make Jell-O or other gelatin glow under a black light. Here's what you do.

Glue from Milk
Use common kitchen materials to make your own glue. Add vinegar to milk, separate the curds, and add baking soda and water. Glue!

Goo Recipe
Make squishy non-toxic goo that hardens in your hands when you squeeze it, but flows like a liquid when you pour it.

Honeycomb Candy Recipe
Honeycomb candy is an easy-to-make candy that has an interesting texture caused by carbon dioxide bubbles getting trapped within the candy.

Ice Cream in a Baggie
Make a tasty treat and learn about freezing point depression, too! All you need are some basic ingredients and two ziploc baggies. It's easy, fun, and educational.

Invisible Ink - Baking Soda
These are quick and easy instructions for making non-toxic invisible ink using baking soda (sodium bicarbonate).

Invisible Ink - Corn Starch
The writing for this invisible ink technique is done using corn starch. An iodine solution is used to reveal the message.

Invisible Ink - Lemon Juice
Lemon juice is acidic and weakens paper. When paper is heated, the remaining acid turns the writing brown before discoloring the paper.

Iron from Breakfast Cereal
Cold breakfast cereals are usually fortified with iron. What does the iron look like? Find out here!

Ketchup and Baking Soda Volcano
The acetic acid in ketchup reacts with baking soda to produce an extra-special type of lava for a chemical volcano. This is a non-toxic volcano recipe that is sure to please!

Koolaid Playdough
This recipe results in an edible, fruit-scented playdough.

Lava Lamp - Non-Toxic Version
While real lava lamps and lava lites rely on trade secrets, you can get a similar effect with simple household ingredients.

Lickable Stickers
This is a recipe for non-toxic sticker glue.

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream
Make liquid nitrogen ice cream as a cool cryogenics or phase change demonstration or for a quick and tasty treat.

Metamucil Flubber
This recipe makes a non-sticky sort of 'rubber' or gelatinous slime.

Modeling Clay Recipes
There are several ways you can make homemade clay for modeling, making ornaments, and for other projects and crafts. Here are several clay recipes, including a refrigerator clay, a clay you bake to harden, one you coat for a glossy finish, and one that works up and stays pliable much like store-bought modeling clay.

Natural Toothpaste
It's fast, easy, non-toxic, and fluoride-free! Use these instructions to make your own natural toothpaste.

Non-Toxic Paste
This is the classic, simple flour paste.

Oobleck Recipe
Learn how to make Oobleck, a type of slime that has properties of both liquids and solids.

Pepper and Water Science Magic Trick
The pepper and water science trick is one of the easiest magic tricks you can perform. Here's how to do the trick and an explanation of how it works.

Peppermint Cream Wafers
Chemistry and cooking share a lot in common! You can have some Christmas chemistry fun in the lab making these peppermint cream wafer candies.

Plastic from Dairy
Plastics are generally produced from petroleum, but they can come from other sources as well! All that is really required is the ability to join molecules containing carbon and hydrogen together, which you do whenever you curdle milk.

Potato Clock
A potato can function as an electrochemical cell or battery. It's fun to use a potato to power an LED clock.

Red Cabbage pH Paper
Learn how to make your own pH indicator test strips using red cabbage. This is a fun, safe, and easy chemistry project that you can do at home.

Rubber Egg & Chicken Bones
You can make a hard boiled egg bounce like a rubber ball and cause chicken bones to become soft and rubbery. All you need is a common kitchen ingredient.

Salt & Sugar Science Fair Project Ideas
Salt and sugar are two materials you probably have on hand. There are many science fair projects you can do with either of these ingredients. Here's a list of ideas to help get you started on your science fair project.

Salt or Sodium Chloride Crystals
It's easy to grow your own table salt or sodium chloride crystals. All it takes is salt and boiling water. One method even yields crystals within a few hours. Here's what you need to know.

Snow Ice Cream Recipes
Here is a collection of several quick and easy recipes for ice cream you can make using snow.

Stink Bomb Recipes
Stink bombs smell terrible, but they are also fun. Here are instructions for how to use everyday materials to make your own stink bombs.

Sugar and String Crystal Easter Eggs
Sugar and string Easter egg ornaments are a fun family craft idea, plus you can include a lot of science in this project. You can make smaller hollow string ornaments to hang or put in baskets or you can make a large crystal egg to use as an Easter basket.

Sugar Crystals
Sugar crystals are also known as rock candy since the crystallized sucrose resembles rock crystals and because you can eat your finished product. You can grow clear sugar crystals with sugar and water or you can add food coloring to get colored crystals. It's simple, safe, and fun.

Trading Places - Liquid Science Magic Trick
Take two glasses of different-colored liquids and watch the liquids switch places in the glasses. This science magic trick or demonstration can be performed using many different liquids, such as water and wine, water and oil, or water and whiskey.

Vitamin C Determination by Iodine Titration
Use this redox-based iodometric titration to determine the amount of Vitamin C or ascorbic acid in juice and other samples.

Yeast & Hydrogen Peroxide Volcano
Here's how to make a safe and easy chemical volcano using two common inexpensive household ingredients.

Glowing and Flaming Cocktails
These drink recipes are for easy glowing and flaming cocktails. You can make non-alcoholic or mocktail versions of the glowing drinks.

How To Test for Protein in Food
Protein is an essential nutrient that builds muscle in the body. Here is an easy test for protein in food.

How To Make Homemade Vinegar
You can make your own vinegar at home. Many people believe homemade vinegar tastes better than bottles from the store, plus you can customize the flavor with herbs and spices.

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