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potassium bitartrate or cream of tartar (Ju)Cream of Tartar is potassium bitartrate, also known as potassium hydrogen tartrate, which has a chemical formula of KC4H5O6. Cream of tartar is an odorless white crystalline powder.

Where Does Cream of Tartar Come From?

Cream of tartar or potassium bitartrate crystallizes out of solution when grapes are fermented during winemaking. Crystals of cream of tartar may precipitate out of grape juice after it has been chilled or left to stand or the crystals may be found on the corks of wine bottles where the wine has been stored under cool conditions. The crude crystals, called beeswing, may be collected by filtering the grape juice or wine through cheesecloth.

Cream of Tartar Uses

Cream of tartar is used primarily in cooking, though it is also used as a cleaning agent by mixing it together with white vinegar and rubbing the paste onto hard water deposits and soap scum. Here are some of the culinary uses of cream of tartar:
  • Added to whipped cream after it has been whipped to stabilize it.
  • Added to egg whites when whipping them to increase their volume and help them maintain peaks at higher temperatures.
  • Added when boiling vegetables to reduce discoloration.
  • One of the key ingredients in some formulations of baking powder, where it reacts with baking soda and an acid to produce carbon dioxide to promote rising of baked goods.
  • Found with potassium chloride in sodium-free salt substitutes.
  • Used to make icing for gingerbread houses.
Do you know of any additional uses for cream of tartar? If so, please post a response.

Baking Ingredient Substitutions | Copper Bowl for Whipping Egg Whites

Comments

December 29, 2010 at 4:59 pm
(1) Sukhmandir Kaur says:

Interesting, I just found some in the back of my cupboard, though I knew about it’s cleaning properties and use in baking powder, I had no idea it came from grapes.

December 29, 2010 at 9:23 pm
(2) Clean Cup Fan says:

Cream of Tartar is also really good at removing coffee stains from the bottom of coffee pots and cups. Just mix some with water and swirl it around for a while…stains just disappear.

December 30, 2010 at 10:54 am
(3) Candida Conqueror says:

Cream of tartar alkalinizes the body’s ph and is very effective at fighting systemic fungal infections like candida.
Take it in water or mixed with food. Start with 1/4 tsp a day, gradually increase up to 2 tbsp a day for an adult. Hold there for 2 weeks. Then reduce gradually. Keep on a maintenance dose of 1/2 tsp a day to maintain an alkaline ph in your system. Cleansing symptoms vary while on the high dose. If you get cleansing symptoms that are unpleasant, reduce the amt you are taking some but stay on it. Systemic candida has a wide variety of symptoms. Some symptoms that people have seen improvements in from taking cream of tartar are: moodiness, poor concentration, brain fog, skin rashes, thrush, cronic constipation, cronic indigestion and gassiness, dandruff, toenail fungus, foot fungus, jock fungus, and others. It’s a really cool way to fight candida. It’s a natural product. It’s safe to eat. It’s easy to eat. It is an effective way to fight candida without needing diet changes. Considering that the common methods are drugs that are hard on your liver, or a diet that is very strict and free of carbs and sugars, this is an easy and cheap way to go. Cream of tartar is available by the pound at most restaruant supply store or bulk food stores for less than $15/#.

June 21, 2012 at 3:17 pm
(4) I Quit says:

I used 1 tablespoon of cream of tartar in a glass of orange juice to pull all of the nicotine out of my body to quit smoking. It worked. I had been a smoker for over 20 years.

January 22, 2014 at 12:49 pm
(5) pat says:

II just learn recently that this product can clean your system out as far as smoking cigarettes or marijuana. Is this true. How much to take or how ling will it take.

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