1. Education

Discuss in my forum

Although bottled water has an expiration date, it doesn't actually go bad. Why is there an expiration date on a product that doesn't go bad? This is because New Jersey requires all food and beverages, including water, to carry an expiration date on its packaging. It doesn't matter if you don't live in New Jersey... your water may carry an expiration date anyway to make it easier to standardize packaging. Some bottled water only carries its bottling date or a 'best by' date. These dates are helpful because the flavor of the water will change over time as it absorbs chemicals from its packaging. The flavor will not necessarily be bad, but it may be noticeable.

Leaching of chemicals from packaging is a health concern, but as far as toxic chemicals go, you can get exposure to most of those chemicals from freshly bottled water as well as bottled water that has been on the shelf a while. A 'plastic' taste is not necessarily an indicator that the water is bad; absence of an unpleasant flavor does not mean the water is free from contaminants.

While algae and bacteria will not grow in sealed bottled water, the situation changes once the seal has been broken. You should consume or discard water within 2 weeks after opening it.

Can You Drink Too Much Water? | HardVersus Soft Water

Comments

January 26, 2010 at 5:19 am
(1) tudza says:

This may well be, but I had some bottled water in Thailand that tasted absolutely terrible. We bought a bunch of different brands on the golf course and none of the caddies would touch one particular brand, so I volunteered to try it out. It tasted like plastic, but whether this taste was from the bottle or from the bottling facility I could not say.

If a lady ( all our caddies were ladies ) carrying a heavy golf bag on a hot day in Thailand won’t drink it, don’t drink it!

August 25, 2012 at 9:42 am
(2) peaceworks says:

I agree Tudza, I dare to say that I would forego a brand or type of water they’d turn down under those conditions – and believe me, I guzzle water under the least thirst-inspiring situations, let alone a hot day lugging a heavy bag of clubs on a Thai golf course.

But I was always under the impression that a “plastic” taste on bottled water indicated that the bottle composite was itself breaking down so it was wise to not partake. Am I wrong in this? Is it still safe and okay to consume? Hm. I wonder.

In any case, we’re having a beautiful, sunny day here on the west coast of the island of Newfoundland and Labrador and I’m drinking water from a nearby natural, underground spring that tastes heavenly. Wish I could share it with our readers. No need to bottle water here – yet.

August 26, 2012 at 9:06 am
(3) Andre Li says:

I’m not sure about this so Ihave to ask for confirmation I live in the UK so water that is still/stagnant (where mosquitos thrive) does not exist like in hot countiries like Hong Kong

Can bottled water become ‘stale; if left in the sunshine too long (whilst unopened)?

Thanks
Andre

December 29, 2012 at 2:53 am
(4) Whistle blower says:

Water does not go bad because of many chemical reasons.

February 20, 2013 at 10:46 am
(5) Roo Cvo says:

The water doesn’t go bad but plastic is only degraded by sunlight. So if you do store bottled water or just have a drink for the day that is in a plastic bottle do not expose it to sunlight. When plastic begins to break down from sunlight chemicals referred to as” mimic estrogens” are released. These chemicals are referred to as such because once they enter your body, your body recognizes them as estrogen and will try to balance its chemicals. For example as a result from the mimic estrogen consumption your body may slow estrogen production or increase your testosterone production. As for the water going bad, if its in a sealed container it wont go bad but the container itself will. I recommend looking into the pacific ocean garbage patches (yes their are more then one) to see the effects of mimic estrogens in our oceans.

August 10, 2013 at 2:49 pm
(6) crs says:

I have water stored in the basement. The jugs are sealed, but sometimes one of them gradually collapses as the water level slowly declines. Is it evaporating through the seal or what?

October 28, 2013 at 12:34 pm
(7) G Coleman says:

I work for a company that uses bottle water all the time. The problem is the bottle water is in the sun in the back of the trucks most of the time
and never hardly re-stored for days. Some of the water is then placed on ice for the job. The water taste like rust. Then when you open another bottle it taste like rust. You find out that most of the bottle opened taste like rust. But none of the stored bottles has the rust taste.Can you tell me the reason for this.

February 9, 2014 at 5:21 pm
(8) Marcus says:

. So if you do store bottled water or just have a drink for the day that is in a plastic bottle do not expose it to sunlight. When plastic begins to break down from sunlight chemicals referred to as” mimic estrogens” are released. These chemicals are referred to as such because once they enter your body, your body recognizes them as estrogen and will try to balance its chemicals. For example as a result from the mimic estrogen consumption your body may slow estrogen production or increase your testosterone production.)

If i was trying to decrease estrogen and increase test would this be healthy lol!

Leave a Comment


Line and paragraph breaks are automatic. Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title="">, <b>, <i>, <strike>
Top Related Searches
  • bado
  • bottled water
  • august 10
  • gp
  • ©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.